Monograms

Monograms have been around since medieval times. They were first used by craftsmen and guilds to mark their products—often times these products would be furniture, metal tools, etc… Nowadays, they are primarily used as logos for large companies, design firms, and often, an identity mark for the individual designer. See the Wikipedia page on monograms here.

I have been interested in designers’ monograms ever since four years ago when I saw Chip Kidd’s, Stefan Sagmeister’s and Paula Scher’s monographs (not to be confused with monograms) in Design I and saw the little symbol either on the back cover or spine of the book. They were well designed little combinations of the designers’ initials, forming both a distinctive logo as well as a way for the designer to sign his/her work. The moment I laid eyes on those little symbols was the moment I knew I wanted one for myself.

Just today I stumbled across a site called Logo Design Love. As the title promises, the blog highlights cool and innovative logo designs. Think of it as a purely logo’d-out version of FFFFOUND. The Logo Design Love site is kept and designed by a guy named David Airey. His design portfolio is pretty much solely made out of—you guessed it—corporate logos. As I was looking through the annals of Logo Design Love, I rekindled my want for my own monogram, and well, attempted a few basic sketches at one. Perhaps once I get my portfolio site up and running, you’ll recognize the logo.

Some sketches:

{Overlayed an M over an R both set in Akzidenz Bold and deleted out some of the overlapping pieces; I tried to balance form/counterform to highlight elements of both the R and the M.}

{Set in Baskerville Book, squeezed the R and the M together in a way such that the tail of the R forms the stroke that creates the M’s downward point.}

{Same idea as the above sketch, but set in Akzidenz Bold, and focusing more on how the counterforms allude to both the R and M shapes.}

-rgm

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  1. Hi Rohan, good of you to spend a little time on my sites.




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